ArtReproductions™ - DODWELL & POMARDI

dward Dodwell (1767-1832) was an Irish painter, traveler and writer on archaeology. From 1801 to 1806 he travelled in Greece. In 1804 he met the Italian painter, editor and traveler Simone Pomardi (1757-1830) and travelled with him the next two years. Both of them left a great deal of information and drawings of Greece of the beginnings of the 19th century, before the great looting of archaeological treasures that followed. Dodwell published his book “A Classical and Topographical Tour through Greece” in 1819, of which a German translation appeared in 1821; The same year he published the book “Views in Greece”, with thirty colored plates, and in 1834 the book “Views and Descriptions of Cyclopian or Pelasgic Remains in Italy and Greece”. 
The Collection Rodaχ – Dodwell & Pomardi contains five high quality ArtReproductionsTM of monumental drawings of Dodwell & Pomardi, with high resolution prints in heavy stock art paper. 


TRAVELERS AND CLASSIC ANTIQUITY
Starting in the 15th century, a continuous flow of Western European travelers kept reaching mainland Greece and Easter Mediterranean, then under Ottoman occupation. Their interest was directed in the monuments of Classical Antiquity, fueled by a renewed interest in humanities and archaeology; the trend peaked in the 18th and 19th centuries. 
The travelers were scholars, geographers, architects, archaeologists, even merchants, leaving t a huge wealth of texts and drawings - which today are an invaluable source of information. It is like photojournalism on monuments, artifacts or landscapes lost forever. Their detailed architectural and engineering designs have formed the basis for the development of that were transported and delivered to the West formed the basis for the development of the Νeoclassic movement, essentially functioning like an arc that transports ancient knowledge and ideas into modern times.  
The task of displaying monuments and landscapes at the time usually yielded comparable results in terms of accuracy and information to those of photography. Most iconographers used the kind of Darkroom, known as Camera Obscura. It was an opaque rectangular box with a small hole that let the light pass; on the opposing wall, an image of the space in front of the hole was formed, inverted and symmetrical. They usually placed a flat mirror, which reflected the image right (but still inverted) into a glass window. There they put a paper and then they traced the imaga with a pencil. Thus, the depiction was flawless, like a photograph. 


The Collection Rodaχ – Dodwell & Pomardi contains five high quality ArtReproductions™ of monumental drawings of Dodwell & Pomardi, with high resolution prints in heavy stock art paper.